Loaded Sourdough Recipe using a Mixer to knead dough

Freshly Baked Bread

Loaded Sourdough Recipe using a Mixer

I thought I would try a mixer for kneading my bread; mixers are cheap, although quality never usually is but you can pick one up now for next to nothing now or even less than that if you search on a local buy & sell site. I am told that kneading your bread is quite hard on the mixers motor and will shorten its life span, but if I get a couple of years out of it, it won’t owe me a thing. Let’s jump into this recipe now. I must have been hungry putting this together as I just kept adding ingredients, and, in this case, it worked out nicely. First, you will need to read my notes in the sourdough page at this site on building a starter and leaven before you begin if you do not already have a mature starter. You will need to have a starter and active leaven before you get going on any sourdough recipe, or! you can substitute the starter with an active yeast (8gms) if do not wish to develop a starter. It will not be as good as the sourdough recipe but will still be great.
Prep Time 2 hrs
Cook Time 30 mins
Resting Time 2 hrs
Total Time 4 hrs 30 mins
Course bread, Side Dish
Cuisine American, French
Servings 10 slices

Equipment

  • Dutch Oven, Measuring Cup, Mixing Bowl, Thermometer, Scale, Scoring Knife, 6" cake pan, Banneton Basket or Proofing Bowl, Wooden Spoon.

Ingredients
  

  • 200 gm white organic flour
  • 30 gm light rye flour
  • 20 gm whole wheat
  • 30 gm spelt flakes
  • 5 gm caraway seeds
  • 5 gm pepper
  • 5 gm rosemary
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 75 ml grated fresh parmesan
  • 100 ml crushed walnuts
  • 90 gm active leaven
  • 280 gm water

Instructions
 

  • Mix all your flour and seeds, rosemary, pepper & spelt together, mix well and add 250 gm of your water 24-27 degrees (warm). Mix well so all flour is absorbed, saving the remainder for adding the salt at end of autolyzing.
    mixing flour and seeds
  • Now let the mixture sit and develop gluten before adding salt, this is called autolyze; autolyze lessens the time needed to knead or fold and stretch your dough as it begins to develop the gluten during this stage. The dough temperature should be between 23- 28 degrees to develop gluten’ & simple sugars so once you add the water keep it in a warm spot. A common trick is turning the oven light on and place your mixing bowl with dough inside the oven, or you can buy a bread proofer. The temperature should be monitored as you do not want it too hot or too cold. Let the mixture sit for 30 minutes.
    adding water to flour
  • Now add your leaven, mix well with your hands, then let it sit for another 20 – 30 minutes; making sure to monitor dough temperature, keeping it between 23 – 28 degrees. If you are using the oven by turning on the light on, make sure you monitor as it can get to warm. Now add your salt by sprinkling it evenly over your dough; then add the remaining 15 gm of water (28-32 degrees) and mix well with hands; let sit for 15 min, then add the remainder of the water. Once salt is added it is considered to be the end of the autolyze process.
    Leaven
  • Let the mixture sit for 15 minutes. Then add dough to mixer bowl; adding ½ teaspoon of malt syrup to the dough. The lower dough hook and set on the lowest level; let the mixer run for 3-4 minutes, then turn off for 10 minutes. You can add water or flour (by the teaspoon) if your dough presents itself as too dry or too wet on the initial mix, but if you have been accurate using metric weights you should not have to do this. Give the dough time to develop and mixer time to cool (10 minutes); continue to mix for again for 3-4 minutes. Let sit then check dough for development. You can check to see if by stretch dough with your hands; see if it is starting to hold a membrane; if not mix for few more minutes until you have some strength in the dough; then you can add your parmesan and walnuts; then mix for another couple of minutes. Continue this cycle until dough presents good strength by holding membrane.
    membrane
  • Once finished let the dough sit in the same warm spot for another 1-2hrs allowing it to settle and ferment. The dough should rise by at least 40-50%; this is bulk fermenting stage.
    risen dough
  • Take the dough out of your container; place on a lightly floured countertop. Fold the dough back on itself. Turn the dough over with a dough knife; sprinkle a little flour on top; and tighten up by pushing in on the bottom and rotating at the same time. Let the dough sit for 15 – 20 minutes (bench rest).
    shaping
  • Flip the dough over seam side up and place on parchment paper dusted with cornmeal; place in forming a bowl. Now you can stitch the bread; Stitching is taking a small piece of the outside part of your dough and pulling it back to the middle of the dough; applying a little pressure so that it sticks to itself. This procedure tightens up your dough into a nice ball, which makes for a better rise. You can now add some garnish at this point as well, seeds, nuts, rosemary whatever you fancy. Leave in a warm spot (oven w/ light on) or just throw some tea towels over container; monitor rise you are looking for roughly 30% rise; be patient and catch it on the rise then cover and place in the fridge for the night. The dough will continue to prove in the refrigerator.
    proofing bowl
  • Note: Letting the dough rise before placing in the refrigerator is a common practice. It has been my experience that if you are gentle with dough, as you should be later in the development stage. You can put the dough straight into the refrigerator, dismissing final proof. The dough will rise in the container overnight. This will avoid any over proving.
  • Next day, preheat oven to 550 degrees F and place the Dutch oven in to for 45 minutes. In the meantime, you can now easily score your loaf with a scoring knife, if not available just use a shape knife. Scoring allows the dough to open up on your cuts during its oven rise. From here my go-to method is now steaming see my page on this site for steaming bread.
    scoring dough
  • The Coles notes on steaming bread while baking, are; pour 50 ml of hot water in Dutch Oven; then take the bottom of a cake mould (6”) place upside down, be careful not to burn hands. Now place dough, while still in the parchment paper on top of the cake pan and return to oven at 550 for 5 minutes, then turn oven down to 450 for 25- 30 min. Take out and baste with olive oil; return to oven uncovered for 5 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven and let sit on a grid or rack for 1 hrs before cutting.
    cake pan
  • Or use the traditional method & Take the Dutch oven out and place dough in the Dutch oven along with the parchment paper. Take a spray bottle and give it a couple of sprays of water; this helps in keeping the crust soft, place lid back on & place in the oven for 5 minutes; then turn down the temperature down to 450 degrees for 30 minutes; again, these times will vary as ovens vary. Take out of the oven and remove lid; loaf should be golden brown at this point. Pour a little olive oil over top and use a brush to spread over the top of the loaf; this aids to a nice soft crust. Place back in the oven for 5-10 minutes without a lid; remove from oven, the loaf should be a darker brown now; if not place back in for 5 minutes or so until it is. Remove from oven and let sit on a grid or rack for 1 hr before cutting. Enjoy!
    dough dutch oven

Video

Notes

When using my steaming method for baking bread, you can adjust temperatures depending on dough consistence and especially if you are using the full cake pan as a mould to cook in. In this situation place in oven at 550 for 5 minutes then turn down to 450 or even 425 for 30 minutes with lid on this will ensure you dough is cooked straight through. Check after 30 if browned then place back in uncovered for 5-10 minutes.
loaf baked in cake pan
baked in dutch oven using cake pan
Keyword baking bread in a dutch oven, Baking Sour Dough Bread in a Dutch Oven, how to bake bread, kneading dough using a mixer, steaming bread, using a mixer with dough

Light Rye with Caraway Seeds – Steaming bread in your Dutch Oven!

Light Rye with Caraway Seeds – Steamed!

Steaming bread in your Dutch Oven is easy and we'll show you how,but first, you should read my notes in the sourdough page at this site on building a starter and leaven before you begin if you do not already have a mature starter. You will need to have a starter and active leaven before you get going on any sourdough recipe, or! you can substitute the starter with an active yeast (8gms) if do not wish to develop a starter. It will not be a sourdough recipe but still a very nice loaf. If you like rye bread, this light rye recipe will be one of your favourites for sure!
Prep Time 1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time 35 mins
resting time 1 hr
Total Time 3 hrs 5 mins
Course artisan, bread
Cuisine American, French
Servings 10 slices

Equipment

  • Dutch Oven, Measuring Cup, Mixing Bowl, Thermometer, Scale, Scoring Knife, Banneton Basket or Proofing Bowl, Wooden Spoon. 6" cake pan

Ingredients
  

  • 200 gm white organic flour
  • 120 gm light rye flour
  • 30 gm whole wheat
  • 50 gm spelt flakes
  • 10 gm caraway seeds
  • 90 gm active leaven
  • 280 gm water warm

Instructions
 

  • Mix all your flour and seeds together, if you would like a little pepper, perhaps a ½ – 1 tsp. of crushed pepper can be added as well. Mix well and add 225 gm of your water 24-28 degrees (warm). Mix well so all flour is absorbed, saving remainder for kneading in the bowl.
  • Now we let the mixture sit and develop gluten before adding salt, this is called autolyze; autolyze lessens the time needed to knead or fold and stretch your dough as it begins to develop the gluten during this stage. The dough temperature should be between 23- 28 degrees to develop gluten’ & simple sugars so once you add the water keep it in a warm spot. A common trick is turning the oven light on and placing your mixing bowl with dough inside oven, or you can simply buy a bread proofer. The temperature should be monitored as you do not want it too hot or too cold. Let the mixture sit for 30 minutes.
  • Now add your leaven, mix well with your hands, then let it sit for another 30-60 minutes; making sure to monitor dough temperature, keeping it between 23 – 28 degrees. If you are using the oven by turning on the light on, make sure you monitor as it can get to warm. Now add your salt by sprinkling it evenly over your dough; then add 20 gm warm of water ( 24-28 degrees) and mix well with hands. This is now considered to be the end of the autolyze.
    Leaven
  • Continue to add the remaining water in 15 -20 gm’s in allotments; folding the dough back onto itself repeatably until it starts to be sticky again; essentially you are kneading the bread, continue to do this until all your water is gone. Let the dough sit in the same warm spot for another 30 – 45 minutes allowing it to settle and ferment.
  • Kneading! I sometimes feel like just getting the kneading process over with and resort back to the traditional method of kneading the bread for a good 10 minutes until the dough is nice and elastic. You can sprinkle flour on to the dough while kneading to keep it from being too sticky, but don’t overdo. Once finished let the dough sit in the same warm spot for another 2hrs allowing it to settle and ferment, this is bulk fermentation process.
  • OR
  • You can stretch and fold the dough. To stretch and fold, grab one corner of dough start pulling up as much as the dough will allow then fold dough back onto itself, rotate 90 degrees and do the same until you complete a few circles; typically, this is done 3–4 times at regular intervals, I use 15 – 20 minutes in between each F&S. On 3rd or 2nd last Fold & Stretch is a good time to add inclusions as this will help distribute them nicely through the dough. In this recipe you could add some walnuts if you like, myself I feel the caraway seeds are plenty. After folding and stretching is complete let the dough sit until its risen by at least 50 per cent; this should take a couple of hours, and will depend on the climate you are in.
    stretching dough
  • Take the dough out of your container; place on a lightly floured countertop. Fold the dough back on itself. Turn the dough over with a dough knife; sprinkle a little flour on top; and tighten up by pushing in on the bottom and rotating at the same time. Let the dough sit for 15 – 20 minutes (bench rest).
  • Flip the dough over seam side up and place on parchment paper dusted with cornmeal; place in forming a bowl. Now you can stitch the bread; Stitching is taking a small piece of the outside part of your dough and pulling it back to the middle of the dough; applying a little pressure so that it sticks to itself. This procedure tightens up your dough into a nice ball, which makes for a better rise. You can now add some garnish at this point as well, seeds, nuts, rosemary whatever you fancy. Leave in a warm spot (oven w/ light on) or just throw some tea towels over container; monitor rise you are looking for a slight rise, as long as you have been gentle after bulk fermentation; be patient and catch it on the rise then cover and place in the fridge for the night. Try finger test, if it springs back gently it is ready. The dough will sometimes continue to prove in the refrigerator.
  • Next day, preheat oven to 550 degrees F and place the Dutch oven in to for 45 minutes. In the meantime, you can now easily score your loaf with a scoring knife, if not available just use a shape knife. Scoring allows the dough to open up on your cuts during its oven rise. From here my go-to method is now steaming see my page on this site for steaming bread.
  • The Coles notes on steaming are; pour 50 ml of hot water in Dutch Oven; then take the bottom of a cake pan (6”) place upside down, be careful not to burn hands. Now place dough in parchment paper on top of the cake pan and return to oven at 550 for 5 minutes then turn down oven to 450 for 30 min. Take out and baste with olive oil; return to oven uncovered for 5 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven and let sit on a grid or rack for 1 hr before cutting.
  • Or use the traditional method & Take the Dutch oven out and place dough in the Dutch oven along with the parchment paper. Take a spray bottle and give it a couple of sprays of water; this helps in keeping the crust soft, place lid back on & place in oven for 5 minutes; then turn down the temperature down to 450 degrees for 30 minutes; again, these times will vary as ovens vary. Take out of the oven and remove lid. The loaf sould be golden brown at this point. Pour a little olive oil over top and use a brush to spread over the top of the loaf; this aids to a nice soft crust. Place back in the oven uncovered for 5-10 minutes until golden brown; if not place back in oven until golden brown. Remove from oven and let sit on a grid or rack for 1 hr before cutting. Enjoy!
    dough dutch oven

Video

Notes

You can also use the full cake mold for this recipe. it makes for better sandwich bread. 
tip: when kneading bread, add a tablespoon of cold butter in the dough, it not only adds to the flavour but helps keep the dough from getting too sticky.
Keyword Artisan Bread, Baking Sour Dough Bread in a Dutch Oven, cooking ideas with bread, rye bread recipe, steaming bread

Healthy Multi-Grain Recipe using Steam to Bake Bread

theyeastthatiknow

Healthy Multi-Grain Recipe Sour Dough

We will show you how using steam to bake your bread, its easy quick and delicious; but first you will need to read my notes in the sourdough page at this site on building a starter and leaven before you begin, if you do not already have a mature starter. You will need to have a starter and active leaven before you get going on any sourdough recipe. For this recipe, we going to add 8 grain or 12 grain plus 50 gms of Ezekie; Ezekiel is a mixture of whole grains that have been allowed to germinate before milled; commonly known as sprouted flour. if adding other inclusions like nuts or dates, add on your 2nd last fold and stretch.
Prep Time1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time35 mins
proving3 hrs
Total Time5 hrs 5 mins
Course: Appetizer, bread, Side Dish
Cuisine: American, French
Keyword: Artisan Bread, autolyze, Baking Bread in Dutch Oven, healthy bread, multi-grain, sourdough
Servings: 15 Slices
Cost: 5.00

Equipment

  • Dutch Oven, Measuring Cup, Mixing Bowl, Thermometer, Scale, Scoring Knife, Banneton Basket or Proofing Bowl, Wooden Spoon. 6" cake pan

Ingredients

  • 200 gm white organic flour
  • 100 gm 8 or 12 grain
  • 50 gm Ezekiel flour
  • 50 gm rye hard
  • 200 gm water
  • 1/8 cup canola oil
  • 90 gm active leaven
  • 1 egg beaten
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 tbsp molasses
  • 1 tbsp brown sugar
  • 10 gm dried rosemary leaves

Instructions

  • Mix all your flour including rosemary together. If you would like to add pepper and perhaps a ½ tsp. of Malt; malt is used to enhance the colour of the bread and to the rise. Place mixture aside; in a separate bowl add an egg and beat, then add sugar, water (warm) & oil, mix well. Now add to your flour mixture and stir well; set aside in a warm spot.
  • This is where we let the mixture sit and develop gluten before adding salt, it is called autolyze; this lessens the time needed to knead or fold and stretch your dough as it begins to develop the gluten during this stage. The dough temperature needs to between 23- 28 degrees to develop gluten’ & sugar so once you add the water keep in a warm spot. You can use a common trick of turning the oven light on and placing inside or buy a bread proofer. The temperature should be monitored as you do not want it too hot or too cold. Let the mixture sit for 30 minutes.
  • Now add your leaven, mix well with your hands, then let it sit for another 30-60 minutes; making sure to monitor dough temperature, keeping it between 23 – 28 degrees. If you are using the oven by turning on the light on, make sure you monitor as it can get to warm. Now add your salt by sprinkling it evenly over your dough; then add 20 gm of water (28-32 degrees) and mix well with hands. This is now considered to be the end of the autolyze.
  • Now add your molasses and honey, mix well. You now need to knead the bread for a good 10 minutes until the dough is nice and elastic. You can sprinkle flour to the dough while kneading to keep it from being too sticky, but don’t overdo. Once finished let the dough sit in the same warm spot for another 2hrs allowing it to settle and ferment.
  • Take the dough out of your container; place on a lightly floured countertop. Fold the dough back on itself. Turn the dough over with a dough knife; sprinkle a little flour on top; and tighten up by pushing in on the bottom and rotating at the same time. Let the dough sit for 15 – 20 minutes (bench rest).
  • Flip the dough over seam side up and place on parchment paper dusted with cornmeal; place in forming a bowl. Now you can stitch the bread; Stitching is taking a small piece of the outside part of your dough and pulling it back to the middle of the dough; applying a little pressure so that it sticks to itself. This procedure tightens up your dough into a nice ball, which makes for a better rise. You can now add some garnish at this point as well, seeds, nuts, rosemary whatever you fancy. Leave in a warm spot (oven w/ light on) or just throw some tea towels over container; monitor rise you are looking for roughly 40% rise. You will find with this recipe that it takes 2-3 hrs to prove; be patient and wait for rise then cover and place in the fridge for the night.
  • Next day, preheat oven to 550 degrees F and place the Dutch oven in to for 45 minutes. In the meantime, you can now easily score your loaf with a scoring knife, if not available just use a shape knife. Scoring allows the dough to open up on your cuts during its oven rise. From here my go-to method is now steaming see my page on this site for steaming bread.
    scoring dough
  • The Coles notes on steaming are; pour 50 ml of hot water in Dutch Oven; then take the bottom of a cake pan (6”) place upside down, be careful not to burn hands. Now place dough in parchment paper on top of the cake pan and return to oven at 550 for 5 minutes, then turn down to 450 for 25-30 min. Take out and baste with olive oil; return to oven uncovered for 5 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven and let sit on a grid or rack for 2 hrs before cutting.
  • Or use the traditional method & Take the Dutch oven out and place dough in the Dutch oven along with the parchment paper. Take a spray bottle and give it a couple of sprays of water; this helps in keeping the crust soft, place lid back on & place in the oven for 5 minutes; then turn down the temperature down to 450 degrees for 30 minutes; again, these times will vary as ovens vary. Take out of the oven and remove lid; loaf should be golden brown at this point. Pour a little olive oil over top and use a brush to spread over the top of the loaf; this aids to a nice soft crust. Place uncovered back in the oven for 5 minutes until the loaf should is golden brown, if not place back in for 5 minutes or so until it is. Remove from oven and let sit on a grid or rack for 2 hrs before cutting. Enjoy!

Video

Easy No-Knead Bread Packed with Flavour!

No Knead Bread

This No-Knead bread is easy and is packed with flavour! No-Knead bread has gained so much popularity. Jim Lahey (at least as far as I know) came up with the no-knead recipe; long fermentation, this is key to this technic as it develops gluten from elongated fermintation; as a consummate procrastinator, starting something then finishing it later, really works for me!
Prep Time45 mins
Cook Time1 hr 45 mins
Rest time1 hr 30 mins
Total Time4 hrs
Course: Appetizer, bread, Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Artisan Bread, baking bread in a dutch oven, cooking ideas with bread, Dutch Oven, how to make bread in a Dutch oven, No Knead Bread
Servings: 15 Slices
Cost: $4.00

Equipment

  • Dutch Oven, Measuring Cup, Mixing Bowl, Thermometer, Scale, Scoring Knife, Banneton Basket or Proofing Bowl, Wooden Spoon.

Ingredients

  • 500 gm White flour organic
  • 10 gm Sea Salt or Kosher Salt
  • 5 gm Crushed Pepper optional
  • 5 gm Rosemary optional
  • 300 gm water 28 – 31
  • 7 gm Fresh Yeast or Dry Active

Instructions

  • Mix all the ingredients into the flour other than water, and if you want to play with flour mixture a bit you can get away with it on this recipe. The recipe as it stands makes a light fluffy loaf; if you want to add some different textures, however, use 450g white flour and add either 100g hard whole wheat; or 100g 7 grain; or 100g rye, or a mixture of all, experiment. Next, warm up some water to 28-33 degrees, if you are using fresh yeast add it to the water and let it dissolve or crumble it in with the flour, then add the water and mix well with a wooden spoon. The mixture will be very dry, don’t fret! Now comes the tough part leave it alone! Cover it up with the lid if the bowl comes with one or use a wet towel or saran wrap. Let the mixture sit for a couple of hours and then place in the refrigerator for a couple of days, checking in on now and then to punch back dough if it has risen too much; or let the mixture sit for 12 -18 hrs for processing same day or next day.
    mixing flour and seeds
  • Now that it is fermented whether retarding the fermentation over a few days or using a same-day method; gluten has now developed. As this is called no-knead bread; you can skip the stretch and fold step that's next, but I incorporate stretching & folding. Stretching and folding makes a better dough; do this by taking a corner of the dough stretching out the dough then pull it back on top of itself; rotating the dough 90 degrees each time; do this 3-4 every 15 minutes. Let sit for 60 minutes, allowing the dough to rise, this is bulk fermentation.
  • You now need to tighten the dough up into a nice tight ball using a dough blade or hands, to prepare the dough for its final proof in a forming bowl, you can use any 1800 ml or 8 cups container or a banneton basket. Flip the formed ball seam side up; I place it on parchment paper dusted with cornmeal then put it in the bowl. Let the dough rise, this is the proofing stage; the proofing for this recipe will only be about 30-60min; when the dough rises by roughly 30%, it's ready for the oven; if you are placing dough in the refrigerator overnight which is recommended; you can place in fridge after a 20-30% rise is fine. Keep an eye though as you do not want to over prove and have the dough fall, don’t be overly anxious! just try to catch on the rise. Touch the dough with your finger if the dough responds back gently its good to go if it responds too quickly it has not finished. The best conditions for this is at 78 degrees F or 25 degrees C if you want you can stick it in the oven with the light on this will simulate a good environment for proofing. If you leave on the counter, it will rise, depending on your climate and house temperature that will dictate the speed of the proofing.
  • Now that it has risen place in the refrigerator overnight, this is preferred; make sure the bowl is covered with lid or saran wrap, to keep moist. Place Dutch oven in a preheated oven at 550 degrees for 45-60 minutes. Now take the bowl out of the refrigerator and score with a scoring knife or sharp knife; this is much easier now that the dough is cold. Sprinkle with some seeds on for show sesame or poppy are a good suggestion or whatever you would like to garnish it with. You can also do this right after placing in your forming bowl, prior to final proof for easy prep.
    scoring dough
  • Take Dutch oven out, placing on the stove and removing lid; keep the loaf in the parchment paper place gently into Dutch oven then get a little water sprayer and give it a few squirts just enough to dampen and create some steam. Cover and return to oven for 5-10 minutes, then turning down the oven to 450 degrees and set timer for 30 minutes; ovens can vary in temperatures so my times should be used as an approximation; after 30 minutes the loaf should be golden brown at this point If you like a softer crust (my preference) brush bread with olive at this point; leave lid off and return to oven for 5-10 minutes until a darker brown. Take the loaf out of Dutch oven and let it air on a rack for a couple of hours before cutting. 

Notes

Some further variations to this would be; after you initially add water and yeast, letting the dough rise overnight. Knead the dough, yes that’s right, knead! kneading develops the gluten in your dough, giving the dough structure. Although you have created gluten by the slow fermentation process a little help in further development adds to your texture. You can fold and stretch or knead the bread the old way here’s a good video from Allrecipes. Use a dough knife or scraper to help round up the dough off the surface. BTW do not over flour the surface! All this does is very temporarily ease its sticky texture but the dough eats it up the extra flour just makes for tough bread.  Knead your bread tell it starts to retain its strength; you can do this by holding it up and pulling at it will show you if it holds that membrane without tearing. 

Sour Dough Bread Baked in a Dutch Oven with 8 Grain & Much More! So Good!

8 Grain Sour Dough packed w/inclusions Baked in a Dutch Oven

This 8-grain Sour Dough recipe is packed with inclusions that will make your bread a hit. If you do not have a starter please read my notes in the sourdough page on building a starter and leaven before you begin. You will need to have a mature starter and active leaven before you get going on any sourdough recipe. For this recipe, we going to add 8 grain, Parmesan, pepper, walnuts & rosemary. I add the rosemary & pepper to a large majority of my recipes; you can add these ingredients before the water, this way you can mix well throughout the dough; adding the other inclusions on your 2nd last fold and stretch.
Note: If you do not wish to build a natural yeast (starter) you can always use a store-bought active yeast (7-8gms) in place of the starter for most of the sour dour recipes. You would also not need to do an autolyse step if working with active yeast.






Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time1 hr 30 mins
Resting time2 hrs
Total Time4 hrs
Course: artisan, bread, Side Dish
Cuisine: American, French
Keyword: 8 grain bread recipe, autolyze, Baking Sour Dough Bread in a Dutch Oven, bread proofer, Dutch Oven, how to make bread in a Dutch oven, kneading, sour dough bread, stitching bread, stretch & fold
Servings: 15 slices
Cost: $8.00

Equipment

  • Dutch Oven, Measuring Cup, Mixing Bowl, Thermometer, Scale, Scoring Knife, Banneton Basket or Proofing Bowl, Wooden Spoon.

Ingredients

  • 200 gm white organic flour fresh
  • 100 gm whole wheat flour hard
  • 50 gm rye flour hard
  • 50 gm 8 grain oats
  • 280 gm water 28-32 degrees c
  • 90 gm leaven active see notes on starter
  • 1/2 cup crushed walnuts
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan freshly grated or fresh chunks
  • 10 gm pepper crushed
  • 10 gm Rosemary dried; to taste
  • 1 tbsp Butter chunks of cold butter

Instructions

  • Add 225 gm of water of your total water at 28 – 32 degrees to flour; mix well so all the flour is absorbed. It is a common practice to use your hands for this; if you are adverse to sticky hands use a wooden spoon for most of the mixing; dip hands in cold water mixed with olive oil before mixing with hands.
    Let the mixture sit and develop gluten before adding salt, it is called autolyze; this lessens the time needed to knead or fold and stretch your dough as it begins todevelop the gluten during this stage. The dough temperature needs to between 23- 28 degrees to develop gluten’ & ssimple ugars so once you add the water keep in a warm spot. You can use this common trick, turn the oven light on then place dough inside the oven;,this mimics a proofer, just be warry on the temp of dough you do not want the dough to rise above 28 degrees. Let the mixture sit for 30 minutes.
  • Now add your leaven, mix well with your hands, then let it sit for another 30 – 60 minutes; making sure to monitor dough temperature, keeping it between 23 – 28 degrees. If you areusing the oven by turning on the light on, make sure you monitor as it can get to warm. Now add your salt by sprinkling it evenly over your dough; then add 20 gm of water (28-32 degrees) and mix well with hands ensuring the salt is blended well throughout the dough. This is now considered to be the end of the autolyze; this is also where I start to fold the dough in bowl; folding it back on its self and push down; do this until the mixture starts to get sticky again.
    Leaven
  • Continue to add the remaining water in 15 – 20 gm’s in allotments; folding the dough backonto itself repeatably until it starts to be sticky again; essentially you are kneading the bread, continue to do this until all your water is gone. while letting the dough sit in the same warm spot between folds, for 15 minutes allowing the dough to settle and ferment.
  • You can now start to stretch and fold the dough. To stretch and fold, grab one corner of dough, start by pulling up as much as the dough will allow then fold the dough back onto itself, rotate 90 degrees, continue to rotate and stretch for a few full rotations; this step should be done 3–4 times in regular intervals, I use 10-15 minutes in between each F&S. On 2nd last Fold & Stretch is the time to add inclusions, this will help distribute additives nicely throughout the dough. In this case, parmesan, walnuts and butter. Let the mixture sit again for 10-15 minutes before last fold and stretch. After the folding and stretching is complete let the dough sit until its risen by roughly 30-40 per cent; this should take 1-2hr, depending on the temperature & climate you are in.
  • Take the dough out of your container; place on a lightly floured counter top. Fold the dough back on itself, taking care to be a little gentler now with dough. Turn the dough over with a dough knife (if you have one); sprinkle a little flour on top; and tighten up by pushing in on the bottom and rotating at the same time. Let the dough sit for 15 – 20 minutes (bench rest).

























  • Flip the dough over seam side up and place on parchment paper dusted with corn meal; or place in forming bowl. Now you can  stitch the bread; Stitching is taking a small piece of theoutside part of your dough and pulling it back to the middle of the dough; applying a little pressure so that it sticks to itself. Stitching tightens up your dough into a nice ball, which makes for a better rise. You can now add some garnish at this point as well, seeds, nuts, rosemary whatever you fancy. Leave in a warm spot (oven w/ light on) or just through some tea towels over container; monitor rise you are looking for roughly 30% rise; try to catch on the rise, do not let it over proof as it makes for a flat loaf; give it a poke with your finger if it gently responds it is ready; too quickly and its not ready. Now cover and place in thefridge for the night.
  • Next day, preheat oven to 550 degrees F and place the Dutch oven in to for 45 minutes. In the meantime, you can now easily score your loaf with a scoring knife, if not available justuse a shape knife. Scoring allows the dough to open up on your cuts during itsoven rise. Take the Dutch oven out and place dough in the Dutch oven along with the parchment paper. Take a spray bottle and give it a couple of sprays of water; this helps in keeping the crust soft, place lid back on & place in the oven for 5 minutes; then turn down the temperature down to 450 degrees for 30 minutes; these times will vary as all ovens vary. Take the Dutch Oven out of the oven and remove lid; the loaf should be golden brown at this point. Pour a little olive oil over top and use a brush to spread over the top of the loaf; this aids to a nice soft crust. Place back in the oven for 5-10 minutes without a lid; remove from oven, the loaf should be a golden brown now; if not place back in for 5 minutes or so until it is. Remove from oven and let sit on a grid or rack for 1 hr. before cutting. Enjoy!

Montreal Bagels/Sourdough/Pizza Oven

Montreal Style Bagels made with Sour Dough Starter

Please read my notes in the sourdough page on starter and leaven before you begin. You will need to have a mature starter and active leaven before you get going on any sourdough recipe. For this recipe, we going deviate from the tradition Montreal Style and use natural yeast from our leaven. This recipe easy & BTW we get kneading done all at once; yes, you’ll gain a little strength in your arm or get a mixer! I have recently and love it. Side note you’ll also notice I jump back and forth from metric to standard; one because I’m Canadian and two, when I use standard, I use as an approximation; always use metric for accuracy, baking is done by weight, not by volume. So, buy a scale and use measuring utensils with metric & standard scales to help.
Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time25 mins
Resting Time2 hrs
Total Time3 hrs 25 mins
Course: artisan, Side Dish
Cuisine: American, French
Keyword: Begals, Dutch Oven, how to make begals, montreal style begals, sourdough
Servings: 10 bagels
Calories: 90kcal
Cost: $5.00

Equipment

  • Dutch Oven

Ingredients

  • 500 gm white organic flour
  • 250 gm water
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1/3 cup sesame seeds
  • 110 gm active leaven
  • 15 gm fine grain sea salt

Instructions

  • Mix Flour, water (hold back 20 gm’s for salt), egg yok, 2 tbsp honey, maple syrup, leaven and oil. Mix well by hand; now let the mixture sit for 20-30 minutes.
  • Add Salt, pour remaining water and mix well for a few minutes; again, let the mixture sit for 10- 15 minutes before kneading.
  • Kneading, you can knead on the countertop with some flour, adding more when it gets to sticky or folding back on itself in the bowl, your choice. It is important to knead tell the dough is smooth and can retain a nice membrane; you do this by holding your dough up pulling with thumbs in the middle; if it holds without tearing, it's ready!
  • Place the dough aside, covered in a warm area; you can place in the oven with the light on. Add water to Dutch Oven and bring to boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cover.
  • Take the dough out and cut into 9 -10 equal portions with a dough knife. Roll dough into about 12-inch portions then twist ends together; make sure to roll the ends together well, you don’t want the bagel to come unseparated.
  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees. If you have a pizza stone; place stone in the oven to heat up, nice and hot, 500 degrees, turn back down to 450 when placing the bagels on. If you do not have a stone just use a baking pan either lightly oiled or with some parchment paper.
  • Take the lid off Dutch Oven and make sure water is simmering nicely you may have to turn up the heat just a bit to maintain a simmer; add your honey to the water. Place a bagel on large straining spoon and place in water; you can place three bagels in Dutch Oven at a time; let them boil till they rise to the top, then flip and let simmer for another minute.
  • Place bagels on a towel-covered board. Have a bowl filled with sesame seeds or nuts of choice. If using nuts crush so they stick to the dough. Drop bagel top in the mixture and then place back on the towel.
  • Whether you are using a pizza stone a tray or pan with parchment, sprinkle some cornmeal on the surface before placing the bagels on. Cook at 450 degrees for 25 minutes; let cool and eat. Freeze any you are not eating that day they freeze well.

Notes

If you do not wish to use natural starter; replace leaven with of 8 gm’s of yeast. 

Baking a double batch of Sour Dough- One Double Cheese & Pepper & One Focaccia using a Dutch Oven & Pizza Stone

Double batch Cheese & Focaccia Sour Dough

In this recipe, let's show you how to make two great works, a Double batch Cheese & Focaccia Sour Dough. Refer to my notes in the sourdough page on starter and leaven before you begin. You will need to have a mature starter and active leaven before you get going on any sourdough recipe. We are going to make a loaf with Parmesan, cheese, pepper & rosemary; for the second we will use about a third of the dough for a small Focaccia. Add the rosemary & pepper in the flour mixture right from the start before the water, distribute well throughout the flour; add the other inclusions on your 2nd last fold and stretch. I am using 50 gm of Ezekial flour in this recipe, this is an ancient mixture of flour. If this is not available don't fret, you can use a host of other flours, spelt, 7 grain or double up on one of the other rye or whole wheat.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time2 hrs
Resting Time2 hrs 15 mins
Total Time4 hrs 45 mins
Course: bread, Side Dish
Cuisine: American, French, Italian
Keyword: Artisan Bread, Baking Sour Dough Bread in a Dutch Oven, cooking ideas with bread, Dutch Oven, Focaccia, how to bake bread, how to make bread in a Dutch oven, kneading, sour dough bread, stretch & fold
Servings: 15 slices
Cost: $10.00

Equipment

  • Dutch Oven, Measuring Cup, Mixing Bowl, Thermometer, Scale, Scoring Knife, Banneton Basket or Proofing Bowl, Wooden Spoon.

Ingredients

  • 650 gm white organic flour
  • 50 gm whole wheat hard
  • 50 gm Ezekial Flour
  • 50 gm rye hard
  • 560 gm water warm – 27 degrees
  • ½ cup parmesan freshly grated or small chunks
  • ½ cup old cheddar
  • 20 gm crushed pepper
  • 10 gm dried rosemary leaves
  • 180 gm active leaven
  • 18 gm fine sea salt

Instructions

  • Add all your flours together with pepper and dried rosemary use generous portions of rosemary, sprinkle tell the top of your flour is covered, mix well! Now add 450 gm of water of your total water at 28 – 32 degrees to flour; mix well so no flour is left unabsorbed. It is common practice to use your hands for this.
    mixing flour and seeds
  • Now we perform a process called Autolyse, What is Autolyse, This is a procedure where we let the mixture sit and develop gluten before adding salt, it lessens the time needed to knead or fold and stretch your dough as this process begins to develop the gluten and simple sugars begin to form. The dough temperature needs to be between 23- 28 degrees to develop gluten’ & sugar so once you add the water keep in a warm spot. You can use a common trick of turning the oven light on and placing your container of dough in the oven, to keep warm or you can always buy a bread proofer. The temperature should be monitored as you do not want it too hot or too cold. Let the mixture sit for 30 min.
    adding water to flour
  • Now add your leaven, mix well with your hands, then let it sit for another 30-60 minutes; making sure to monitor dough temperature, keeping it between 23 – 28 degrees. If you are using the oven by turning on the light on, make sure you monitor as you do not want to get the dough too warm either; so, turn off the light if the temperature starts to gets to 26 degrees. Now add your salt by sprinkling it evenly over your dough; then add 25 gm of water (28-32 degree) and mix well with hands. This is now considered to be the end of the autolyze once the salt is added; this is also where I start to fold the dough in bowl; folding it back on its self and push down; do this until the mixture starts to get sticky again. Let the dough sit for 15 minutes in between the in-bowl kneading, give your dough time to develop.
    Leaven
  • Continue to add the remaining water in increments (25 gm’s) until your total allotment of 560 gm; folding the dough back onto itself repeatably until it starts to be sticky again; essentially you are kneading the bread. Let dough sit in the same warm spot for another 30 minutes allowing it to settle and ferment.
  • Now you can now start to stretch and fold the dough. To stretch and fold, grab one corner of dough and pull up as much as the dough will allow then fold dough back onto itself, rotate 90 degrees and do the same until you complete a few rotations; typically, this is done 3–4 times at regular intervals, I use 15 – 20 minutes in between each F&S.
    stretching dough
  • Prior to third fold, sprinkle some flour on the counter; place your dough on the counter top cutting a third of the dough off to separate for the Focaccia; placing in a separate bowl and complete the fold and stretch.
  • Place remainder in another mixing bowl then add inclusions, this will help distribute them nicely through the dough. In this case Parmesan & Cheese (Old!), then fold and stretch; let sit one last time then complete last fold and stretch. Let the dough sit until its risen by roughly 50 per cent; this should take 2 hrs., it will depend on the climate you are in.
  • Take the dough out of your container; place on a lightly floured counter top. Fold the dough back on itself, taking care to be a little gentler now with dough. Turn the dough over with a dough knife (if you have one); sprinkle a little flour on top; and tighten up by pushing in on the bottom and rotating at the same time. Let the dough sit for 15 – 20 minutes (bench rest).
  • For the Focaccia use a small pan, you can use parchment paper with this if you wish. Cover pan or parchment liberally with olive oil; pour more olive oil on top of dough and dimple it down with your fingers. Once you have dimpled down to flat piece of dough; start adding toppings to your taste, I will use, for today's recipe, cherry tomatoes, asparagus, red pepper, red onion, sausage & bacon, topped with some fresh rosemary and cilantro. For now, cover with some saran wrap and place in the fridge.
  • Back to the cheese bread now! Flip the dough over seam side up and place on parchment paper dusted with cornmeal; place in forming the bowl. Now you can stitch the bread; Stitching is taking a small piece of the outside part of your dough and pulling it back to the middle of the dough; applying a little pressure so that it sticks to itself. This procedure tightens up your dough into a nice ball, which makes for a better rise. You can now add some garnish at this point as well, seeds, nuts, rosemary whatever you fancy. Leave in a warm spot (oven w/ light or just through some tea towels over container; monitor rise you are looking for a roughly 30-40% rise; try to catch on the rise, do not let it over prove as it makes for a flat loaf; give it a poke with your finger if it gently responds it is ready; too quickly and its not ready. Now cover and place in the fridge for the night.
  • Next day, preheat oven to 550 degrees F and place the Dutch oven in to for 45 minutes. In the meantime, you can now easily score your loaf with a scoring knife, if not available just use a sharp knife. Scoring allows the dough to open up on your cuts during its oven rise. Take the Dutch oven out and place dough in the Dutch oven along with the parchment paper. Take a spray bottle and give it a couple of sprays of water; this helps in keeping the crust soft, place lid back on then place in the oven for 5 minutes at 550 F; now turn down the temperature down to 450 degrees for 30 minutes; again, these times will vary as ovens vary. Take out of the oven and remove lid; loaf should be golden brown at this point. Pour a little olive oil over top and use a brush to spread over the top of the loaf; this aids to a nice soft crust. Place back in the oven for 5-10 minutes without a lid; remove from oven, the loaf should be a darker brown now; if not place back in for 5 minutes or so until it is. Remove from oven and let sit on a grid or rack for an hour before cutting & Enjoy!
    dough dutch oven
  • Now for the Focaccia! I use a pizza stone to help cook the bread, but first I put the pan in for 5 minutes to cook for easier handling for transfer to the pizza stone. If you do not have a stone just use your pan for the entire process.
  • Let’s get started; turn oven to 550 F and place the pizza stone in for 45 minutes to get nice and hot. Take the dough out of the fridge & add some fresh garlic, some coarse salt & pepper and slices of mozzarella or provolone cheese optional of course with one last dousing of olive oil. Place pan in the oven for 5 minutes; remove the pan, turning the oven down to 450 F, sprinkle some cornmeal on stone and transfer focaccia to pizza stone with a pizza spatula. Let cook for 10 minutes, keeping an eye! Remove and let sit for 5 minutes before cutting into – enjoy!

Notes

I like to cook focaccia on a pizza stone, two ways of doing this; make your focaccia right on the dough paddle or on parchment paper for easy transfer. 

Parmesan Plus Rosemary & Pepper make this easy bread recipe made in your Dutch Oven extra Tasty!

Baking Parmesan Bread in a Dutch Oven

Very similar to the No-Knead recipe but now we will introduce parmesan and some kneading! don't fret now trust me you'll learn to appreciate its benefits. Adding fresh Parmesan to your bread gives it tang like nothing else. The recipe as it stands makes a light fluffy loaf; if you want to add some different textures, however, use 450g white flour and say 50g hard whole wheat; or 50g 7 grain; or 50g rye, experiment, play with it!
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time1 hr 45 mins
Resting time2 hrs
Total Time4 hrs 15 mins
Course: artisan, bread, Side Dish
Cuisine: American, French
Keyword: autolyze, baking bread in a dutch oven, bread proofer, Dutch Oven, fermenting dough, how to bake bread, kneading, parmesan bread, stretch & fold
Servings: 15 slices
Cost: $6.00

Equipment

  • Dutch Oven, Measuring Cup, Mixing Bowl, Thermometer, Scale, Scoring Knife, Banneton Basket or Proofing Bowl, Wooden Spoon.

Ingredients

  • 500 gm White flour organic
  • 300 gm water 28 degrees
  • 10 gm Sea Salt or Kosher Salt
  • 5 gm Crushed Black Pepper optional
  • 5 gm Rosemary optional
  • 5 gm Onion flakes optional
  • ½ cup grated parmesan
  • 7 gm Fresh Yeast or Dry Active
  • 1 tbsp olive oil

Instructions

  • Mix all the ingredients into the flour other than the water & parmesan. Next, warm up some water to 28 degrees, if you are using fresh yeast add it to the water and let it dissolve or crumble it in with the flour, then add the water and mix well with a wooden spoon or even better use your hands and get the feel of the dough. The mixture will be very dry at first; cover it up with the lid if the bowl comes with one or use a wet towel or saran wrap. Let the mixture sit for 8-12 hrs or let it sit for a couple of hours and then place in the refrigerator for a couple of days, checking in on now and then to punch back dough if it has risen.
    mixing flour and seeds
  • Letting the dough ferment by the retarding in the refrigerator or by leaving on the counter will develop gluten. I, however, find kneading the bread makes for better texture and rise. Following is link from King Author flour gives a great demonstration of, Knead the dough, I use the heel of my hand and push the dough forward, then grip the dough with tips of my fingers to pull back, generally the dough is sticky enough that it doesn’t need to much help to pull back as stick to the hand. Use a dough knife or scraper to help round up the dough off the surface. Do not throw too much flour down on the counter surface all this does is very temporarily ease its sticky texture but the dough eats up the extra flour and makes for tough bread. If you place some olive oil in a bowl with some cold water you can dip your hands in now and again for help with sticky dough.
  • Knead your bread tell it starts to retain its strength; holding it up and pulling at it will show you if it holds that membrane without tearing. This can take some work so if you are not into pounding your bread for 10-15 minutes, then you can stretch and fold as an alternative. With Stretch & Fold, you can leave the dough in your container; you start stretching & folding the dough back on to itself, then rotate 45degrees and continue in a circular motion for a few rotations; now let the dough sit for 15-20 minutes. Doing this repetition 3-4 times will be an alternative way of kneading your bread.
  • On the second last fold or near the end of hand kneading your dough, add your extra inclusions in this case Parmesan.
    risen dough
  • Take the dough out of your container; place on a lightly floured countertop. Fold the dough back on itself, rotating 45 degrees until you have completed a full rotation, taking care to be a little gentler with dough now. Turn the dough over with a dough knife (if you have one); sprinkle a little flour on top; and tighten up by pushing in on the bottom and rotating at the same time. Forming your dough is best done with a dough knife. Let the dough sit for 15 – 20 minutes (bench rest).
    shaping
  • Use your dough knife to help turn dough over seam side up on top of some parchment paper and place in forming the bowl. Now you can stitch the bread; Stitching is taking a small piece of the outside part of your dough and pulling it back to the middle of the dough; applying a little pressure so that it sticks to itself. This procedure tightens up your ball of dough and makes for a better rise. Grate some more parmesan on top and let the dough rise, the dough should increase in size by about 30- 40%; take care not to let the dough overproof, as it will deflate when over-proofed, and then all you have is a flat loaf. Try pocking at the dough lightly with your finger if it responds back gently, it is ready! if it responds too quickly then it is not ready. The dough will continue to rise in the refrigerator, this is why I recommend 30-40% on the final proof. This gets easier with experience; you can always invest in a bread proofer!
  • Once it has risen my suggestion is to place in the refrigerator overnight; make sure bowl is covered with lid or saran wrap, so it doesn’t dry out. Preheat oven to 550 (the hotter the better) degrees F and place the Dutch oven in to for 45 – 60 minutes. Take the bowl out of the refrigerator and score with a sharp knife or razor blade; this is much easier now that the dough is cold; sprinkle with some seeds for show sesame and poppy are a good suggestion or whatever you would like to garnish with.
    dough dutch oven
  • Take Dutch oven out of the oven, keeping the loaf in the parchment paper place gently into Dutch oven, if you like a softer crust give dough a couple of sprays of water with spray bottle before covering and returning to oven; leave at 550 for 5 minutes then turn down the oven to 450 degrees and set timer for 30-35 minutes. Ovens can be different in temperatures so my times should be used as an approximation. After 30 minutes loaf should be golden brown at this point If you like a softer crust, brush the bread with olive; leave the lid off and return to oven for 5- 10 minutes; the loaf should be turning darker brown by now; pull the loaf out and let it air on a rack for a couple of hours.

Sour Dough Basic Recipe: a beginners guide no steps missed

Baking Sour Dough Bread in a Dutch Oven

If you haven't already please read my notes in the sourdough page on starter and leaven before you begin. You will need to have a mature starter and active leaven before you get going on any sourdough recipe. Let’s start with a basic single loaf recipe, from here we can add extras and get more creative. Not to say this isn’t an exceptional loaf to serve; you will love the taste and texture that sourdough brings to the table.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time1 hr 30 mins
Resting Time2 hrs
Total Time4 hrs
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American, French
Keyword: baking bread in a dutch oven, Baking Sour Dough Bread in a Dutch Oven, cooking ideas with bread, Dutch Oven, how to bake bread, how to make bread in a Dutch oven, kneading, sour dough bread
Servings: 10 slices
Cost: $4.00

Equipment

  • Dutch Oven, Measuring Cup, Mixing Bowl, Thermometer, Scale, Scoring Knife, Banneton Basket or Proofing Bowl, Wooden Spoon.

Ingredients

  • 370 gm White flour organic
  • 30 gm Rye
  • 90 gm leaven
  • 10 gm fine Sea Salt
  • 280 gm water
  • 1 tbsp olive oil virgin

Instructions

  • Add 225 gm of water of your total water at 28 – 32 degrees to flour; mix well so no flour is left unabsorbed. It is common practice to use your hands for this, but you can use a wooden spoon if you prefer.
  • This is where we let the mixture sit and develop before adding salt; which is called autolyze; autolyse lessens the time needed to knead or fold and stretch your dough as it helps develop the gluten in this stage. The dough temperature needs to between 23- 28 degrees to develop gluten so once you add the water kept in a warm spot. You can use a common trick of turning the oven light on and placing inside. The temperature should be monitored as you do not want to hot or too cold. Let the mixture sit for 30 – 60 minutes.
    pre-autolyse
  • Now add your leaven, mix well with your hands, then let it sit for another 30 minutes; making sure to monitor dough temperature, keeping it between 23 – 28 degrees. If you are using the oven by turning on the light, make sure you monitor as it can get to warm; so turn off light if the temperature starts to gets too high (26). Now add your salt by sprinkling it evenly over your dough; then add 20 gm of water (28-32 degrees) and mix well with hands. This is now considered to be the end of the autolyze; this is also where I start to fold the dough in bowl; folding it back on its self and push down; do this until the mixture starts to get sticky again.
    Leaven
  • Continue to add the remaining water in 15 -20 gm’s in allotments, allow the dough to rest for 10-15 minutes in between. Continue folding the dough back onto itself repeatably until it starts to be sticky again; essentially you are kneading the bread, continue to do this until all your water is gone. Let dough sit in the same warm spot for another 30 – 45 minutes allowing it to settle and ferment.
  • Now you can now start to stretch and fold the dough. To stretch and fold, grab one corner of dough starts pulling up as much as the dough will allow then fold the dough back onto itself, rotate 90 degrees and do the same for several rotations; this is done 3 – 4 times at regular intervals, I use 15 minutes in between each. After folding and stretching is complete let the dough sit for 1-2 hrs allowing the dough to rise by roughly 30-40%, before shaping.
  • Take the dough out of your container; place on a lightly floured countertop. Fold the dough back on itself, taking care to be a little gentler with dough now. Turn the dough over with a dough knife (if you have one); sprinkle a little flour on top; and tighten up by pushing in on the bottom and rotating at the same time. Let the dough sit for 15 minutes (bench rest).
    shaping
  • Flip the dough over seam side up and stitch the bread. Stitching is taking a small piece of the outside part of your dough and pulling it back to the middle of the dough; applying a little pressure so that it sticks to itself. This procedure tightens up your dough and makes for a better rise. Place on a piece of parchment paper sprinkled with cornmeal or lightly covered with olive oil. You can add some garnish at this point as well, seeds, nuts, rosemary whatever you fancy. As always leave in a warm spot (oven) until you have a rise; roughly 30- 40%; ensure to catch on the rise, do not let it over proof; give it a poke with your finger if it gently responds it is ready, and now place in the fridge for the night.
  • Next day, preheat oven to 550 degrees F and place the Dutch oven in to for 45 minutes. In the meantime you can now easily score your loaf with a scoring knife, if not available just use a shape knife. Scoring allows the dough to open up on your cuts during its oven rise. Take the Dutch oven out and place dough in the Dutch oven with the parchment paper. Take a spray bottle and give it a couple of sprays of water; this helps in keeping the crust soft. Place in the oven for 5 minutes; then turn down the temperature down to 450 degrees for 30 minutes; these times will vary as ovens vary. Take out of the oven and remove lid; loaf should be golden brown at this point. Pour a little olive oil over top and use a brush to spread over the top of the loaf; this aids to a nice soft crust. Place back in the oven for 5 minutes without a lid; remove from oven, the loaf should be a darker brown now; if not place back in for 5 minutes or so until it is. Remove from oven and let sit on a grid or rack for 1 hr before cutting. Enjoy!
    dough dutch oven

Notes

Bacon Bread High Hydration

Baking Bacon Bread in Dutch Oven

How to bake bacon bread in a Dutch oven. This is one of my favourites; like the sausage bread this should only be served toasted with a little butter, this is the ultimate Breakfast Bread! The high hydration is a great recipe to adapt to a number of unique ingredients. So, let's try BACON! it's the same process, use a long fermentation; What is long fermentation for bread dough, it is allowing the dough to develop good gluten by fermenting over 12 – 18 hours or for just a couple of hours on the counter and then stick it in the fridge for 2-5 days, then finish off the process with a stretch and fold to gain extra dough strength. I am again recommending you use a 6"cake moulding pan, Why use a cake pan for your dough, this holds the heavy dough and ingredients in place and gives a nice formed loaf. BTW adding cherry tomatoes to the mix really adds to the loaf as the tomatoes burst when baking, giving it an extra flair.
Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time45 mins
Rest Time2 hrs
Total Time3 hrs 45 mins
Course: bread, Breakfast, Side Dish
Cuisine: American, French
Keyword: Bacon Bread, Baking Bread in Dutch Oven, cooking ideas with bread, Dutch Oven, fermenting dough, how to bake bread, how to make bread in a Dutch oven, kneading, stretch & fold
Servings: 15 slices
Cost: $10.000

Equipment

  • Dutch Oven, Measuring Cup, Mixing Bowl, Thermometer, Scale, Scoring Knife, Banneton Basket or Proofing Bowl, Wooden Spoon.

Ingredients

  • 300 gm White flour organic
  • 50 gm Whole Wheat
  • 50 gm Rye
  • 10 gm Sea Salt
  • 10 gm Crushed Pepper
  • 10 gm Rosemary
  • 10 gm Onion flakes
  • 300 gm water
  • 8 gm Yeast, Dry Active or backers yeast
  • 300 gm cooked sliced bacon diced
  • 100 gm old cheddar crumbled
  • 10 cherry tomatoes whole
  • 1 tbsp olive oil always

Instructions

  • Before baking bread in a Dutch oven. First mix all the ingredients into the flour other than the water, bacon, cheddar & tomatoes. This disperses your additives evenly. Next, warm up some water to 28 – 33 degrees, then add the water and mix well with a wooden spoon or by hand. I prefer just using a wooden spoon with the high hydration as it tends to be a little messier, just make sure to mix well. Cover it up with the lid if the bowl comes with one or place saran wrap on top; now you have the choice of letting it ferment for 12 – 18 hours on the counter or just let it ferment for a couple of hours on the counter, then stick it in the fridge for few days, punching dough down on occasion. It is your time schedule.
    mixing flour and seeds
  • Now that it is fermented whether retarding the fermentation over a few days or using a same-day method, gluten has now developed. I now add stretching and folding the to add to the gluten and dough strength. What is Stretching and folding; stretching & folding; this done by taking a corner of the dough stretching it out without tearing the dough then pull it back on top of itself; rotating the dough 90 degrees each time, completing a few rotations; do this 3-4 times in regular intervals, minimum every 15 minutes. On the 2nd last stretch & fold cycle add the extra inclusions, the diced bacon, cheddar, olive oil & cherry tomatoes this will allow the new ingredients to get mixed in nicely. Let sit for 60 minutes, allowing the dough to rise, this is bulk fermentation, it is important to have a 50% rise before moving to next step.
  • Take the dough out of bowl place on a lightly flour dusted counter. We now want to begin to tighten the dough up before final proof; so make four or more folds on the dough to create a ball, flip the ball seam side down; and tighten this dough up into a nice little ball using a dough knife if you have one, hands if not, push in on the bottom and rotating clockwise; once you have tightened it up the best you can, allow the dough to rest for 10-15 minutes; you should always give your dough time to rest of at least 15 min between any forming or dough manipulation.
  •  Now flip the dough back over seam side up and place in a proofing bowl or a 6” cake pan coated lightly with olive oil. We now are going to stitch the bread; What is stitching bread; stitch the bread is done by taking a corner and pulling it back to the center allowing the dough to stick to itself, this is the final tightening of the dough. Once the dough is stitched this is a good time to sprinkle with some seeds, sesame and poppy are a good suggestion or whatever you would like to garnish with, sprinkling some fresh Parmesan on top is always nice as well. Now let the dough rise, this is the proofing stage; proving it is still alive; we want the dough to rise in size by roughly 20%, you do not want to let the dough rise too much as it will continue to rise in the refridgerator; keep an eye, as you do not want to over prove, try to catch your dough on the rise, this could take 20 – 60 minutes or more depending on your climate and the flour you used; a good test for this is, touch to touch the dough with your finger if the dough responds back gently its good to go if it responds too quickly it has not finished. Best conditions for proofing are at 28 degrees C if you want you can stick it in the oven with the light on, this can simulate a good environment for proofing. If you leave dough on the counter, it will rise depending on your climate and house temperature, this will dictate its speed of proofing.
  • Once it has risen place in the refrigerator overnight; make sure the bowl or pan is covered with lid or saran wrap, so it doesn’t dry out. Next day preheat oven to 550 degrees F and place the Dutch oven in for 45 – 60 minutes. Take the bowl or container out of the refrigerator and score with a sharp knife or razor blade; this is much easier now that the dough is cold.
  • Take Dutch oven out of the oven, place cake pan, or if using a proofing bowl, place dough in Dutch oven, you may want to place on a piece of parchment paper for easier handling. To help keep the crust soft, get a water sprayer and give it a spray or two; just enough to dampen it, then cover and return to the oven; after 5 minutes turn the oven down to 450 degrees and reset timer for 30 minutes; ovens can be different in temperatures so my times should be used as an approximation. After 35 minutes take lid off the Dutch oven, the loaf should be golden brown at this point. To give the bread a nice brown soft crust, brush the top of bread bread thoroughly with olive oil, leave the lid off and return to oven for 5 – 10 minutes; the loaf should be turning darker brown by now; remove loaf out and let it air on a rack for an hour before cutting.

Video

Notes

I have used a cake pan in this recipe as the dough is high hydration, and we are adding a lot of inclusions that weigh the dough down. The cake pan simply acts as a sturdy mold for the dough. You can use a banneton bowl instead or place formed dough on a sheet of parchment paper sprinkled with some cornmeal then place in a suitable plastic container.  
Hope this helps